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It’s John’s Birthday today, and while he might kill me for doing this (if he can catch me), he is 30 today!

I thought I would take this time to tell you a few things about John and why he is an awesome brother: 

1. He fields my various witty remarks (anxiety attacks, pleas for more blog content, harassment about his weekend plans) that I shoot at him via gchat with apparent ease and only occasionally ignores me.

2. John has two general reactions:

Positive reaction: “Great.” Sometimes things can be “glorious,” and then you know it’s really great.
Negative reaction: “S*&T!” The delivery of this remark is always the same regardless of the magnitude of his disapproval. 

3. I can only sometimes detect the fear in his eyes when I tell him my latest crazy scheme.

4. He gives dating advice! My personal favorites are these:
a. Do as I say, not as I do.
b. Do not laugh excessively at a dude’s jokes.
c. Stop dancing like that.
d. No fear, naw mean?
Side note: I literally have no idea what he means. Especially about the dancing.

5. Regardless of what is going on, what we had been talking about previously, John will divert my attention to Vespas. I receive links to them all day long accompanied by his Vespa negotiating tactics:

“Let’s low ball these people and take no prisoners: We’re willing to pay $2400 over 6 months.  Throw in the helmets and the automatic, in-dashboard cannoli dispenser or there is no deal.” 

6. He will practice his golf swing, (sans clubs) anywhere. In public, out in a bar, on the sidewalk, etc.


7. My dog, Toby hates him. But John will walk him for me anyway.
8. When I moved back from California, he let me sleep on his couch on weekends for a whole year and hang out with his friends. I got very good at beer pong.
9. He likes to sing “Shout” in public. To rave reviews.
10. John used to eat some weird stuff when he was younger. One of his favorites was, “grilled cheese dunked in yogurt.” this was a classic American cheese sandwich which he dunked in Dannon vanilla yogurt as he ate it.
Gross.
However! I have updated this gastronomic disaster and created something truly delicious. So in honor of John and his birthday, I give you Comte and Scallion Grilled Cheese on Focaccia Bread with Honey Mustard Yogurt Dipping Sauce.

What You Need:
For the sandwich
4 slices Focaccia bread, sliced about 1″ thick
Comte cheese, sliced thinly: enough to cover the top of two of the Focaccia slices. I used a “Tewksbury” cheese from Valley Shepherd Creamery that I bought at the Union Square Greenmarket.
1 bunch scallions: chop the white and light green parts only, discard the dark green leaves.
2 tablespoons butter
For the honey mustard yogurt dipping sauce
See this recipe from a previous post about a sangwich.
What To Do:
Heat the 2 tablespoons of butter in a frying pan over medium heat. Once the butter is melted, add the chopped scallions and sauté until they are soft, about 7 minutes.
Take your bread slices and one by one, dunk them in the pan of butter and scallions, pressing both sides into the mixture.
In the meantime, heat up the broiler of your oven.
Once you have coated both sides of all four pieces of bread, place the sliced cheese on top of two of the slices. Top these cheesed-up ones with the remaining two pieces of Focaccia and let simmer in the pan for about 2 minutes. Flip and simmer another 2 minutes for the flip side.
By this time, your broiler should be nice and hot. Transfer the sandwiches to a cookie sheet and pop them in the broiler so they get nice and toasty. But watch out for that broiler – don’t let your cheesy masterpieces burn!
Remove from the oven and serve immediately with the honey mustard yogurt dipping sauce on the side.
Finally, in honor of John’s birthday, we are giving away a prize. All you have to do is wish John a happy 30th in the comments of this post and you will be entered to win a prize.
What is this prize, you ask? John was recently in Italy and brought back another jar of this fabulous herbed sea salt.
We will randomly choose one commenter and award him/her the prize!
Happy birthday, little bro!

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This month’s Bathroom of the Month Award goes to Slice, The Perfect Food! While not the fanciest or most polished in terms of loo decor, I walked out of that bathroom feeling like I had visited 1 part carnival, 1 part artist studio, with a dash of wacky/artsy boudoir (see the red crystal chandelier). And with the renegade Muppet art, the only thing missing was this. The large mirrors, tidy appearance, and parquet ceiling sure helped too. But honestly, this bathroom is all about the experience. Go check it out, and while you’re at it, order a Miki.

And if you need other suggestions, let’s review our week’s adventures:

On Monday, it was Marmo’s Birthday, and we gave you a Marmo Special: Farfalle with Sausage recipe.

Tuesday was all about pizza, and we checked out John’s Jersey establishment.

On Wednesday, the Landmark Loews Theatre and Sapthagiri Indian Restaurant hit a home run double feature and make my millennium.

Finally, we hone our crane kicks for the Gramercy Tavern review on Thursday.

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Today is Marmo’s birthday!

The above photos were taken from a scrap book I assembled a looooong time ago entitled, “The Complete Hairstyle Index of Marlene Iaciofano.” In it, I displayed photographic examples of her numerous hairstyles (The Box jokes that she’s had about 742 of them) and numerated them for ease of identification for both herself and her stylists. Personally, my favorite is Baby Marmo, sporting what looks like a wig, but is actually all her real hair. Marmo has a nice head of hair, people. John would like to think he inherited this trait.

In addition to good hair, Marmo has a lot of other fantastic qualities that make her a good mom. Here are some of them:

1. Her refrigerator, while alarming and a potential health hazard, is always stocked full. You will never starve in the Iaciofano house. Unless The Box is there.

2. She makes no sense. In a good way! Marmo has a deep reservoir of energy. Often this comes out in her speech patterns. Like when she attempts to put three thoughts into one sentence.

3. She refers to either John or I as “Johnelana” or “Elanajohn”.

4. She always wants to try new restaurants.

5. She likes taking her children to foreign countries like Italy. It’s John’s turn this time – they depart on Friday.

6. She refers to my dog Toby as “Little Cesar” and “that cute little dawg” (please read with NJ accent). And treats him like her grandchild.

7. She will still make John breakfast.

8. She is an excellent cook.

Below, I am offering you one of Marmo’s tried and true pasta dishes: Farfalle with Sausage. This pasta dish makes almost everyone happy almost all of the time. It’s a Marmo special. The sauce is a tomato cream (the whole tomatoes provide a chunky consistency) with a kick from the red pepper. As for the sausage, if you like extra spice, you can use a spicy Italian sausage. Otherwise, a sweet sausage is a perfect contrast.

What You Need:
1 small onion, chopped
3 Tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon oregano
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/4 cup heavy cream
3 cloves of garlic, chopped
4-6 links of sausage, casing removed
1/4 cup parsley, chopped
1 can whole tomatoes
Grated Parmesan cheese
1 box farfalle pasta

What To Do:
Heat the oil in a large pan over medium-low heat. Cook sausage meat, without casings. As the sausage cooks, break it into small pieces with a wooden spoon. Cook until the sausage is browned.

If too much fat has accumulated in the pan, you can drain it off, but leave about 2 tablespoons (a little fat goes a looooong way).

Add chopped onions and garlic and stir.

Add spices and herbs and the can of tomatoes.

Bring to a boil and add the heavy cream. Reduce the heat and cook on a very low heat for 20 minutes.

in the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Once it is boiling, add about 1/2 teaspoon of salt to the boiling water. Add your farfalle pasta and cook until al dente (check package instructions).

Drain the pasta in a colander, and the cooked pasta into a large pasta serving bowl. Add in the sauce and toss to coat.

Garnish with grated Parmesan cheese, and a little extra chopped parsley.

Serves 4-5 people.

Wanna wish Marmo a happy one? Go “like” her company, Gourmet Getaways on Facebook!

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Two weeks ago, I had my most popular tweet ever (it beat out the old record holder, “I am in love with a squash”). I posted a photo of some red velvet pancakes that I enjoyed at the Original Pancake House in West Caldwell, NJ. People went bonkers over this picture! I received requests for the recipe (didn’t have one), pleas for descriptions, and threats on my life (not really) if I didn’t post more details soon.

This weekend I covered my kitchen in red dye, flour, and confectioners sugar in an attempt to deliver a recipe to you. But first, I will give you some highlights from the Original Pancake House.

This Christmas wreath greeted us in the Pancake House parking lot. I was immediately on my guard. I am suspicious of holiday decorations kept up overly-long. However, I persisted (fortitude!) and ordered the following: a Southwestern Omelette with a side of Red Velvet Pancakes.

Still slightly put off by the Christmas wreath, I dove into the pancakes. They were amazing: silky smooth, moist (not crumbly at all), with a hint of chocolate flavor and sweetness. I loved them. I even took the leftovers home (along with the leftovers of everyone else).

On a random side note, the Southwestern Omelette was HUGE. I think it was comprised of about 12 eggs. That were inflated. It was the fluffiest omelette I’ve ever seen or eaten, and its resemblance to a half-deflated volley ball should not count against it:

And in true Jersey diner fashion, there were post-meal gumballs.

But back to the pancakes! This is what you want, yes? A recipe! And here it is. I have cobbled this together from a few sources, and also made parts of it up as taste dictated. I hope you enjoy. I really do, because this recipe makes a cart-full of pancakes, so you’ll have a lot of them to deal with.

For the Pancakes:
(NOTE: This makes a heck of a lot of pancakes. Way more than even I can eat at once.
2 cups flour
3 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups buttermilk
2 eggs
1/4 cup unsalted butter (1/2 of a stick) + more to grease the griddle or frying pan
3 1/2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder (I used Ghirardelli)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons white vinegar
Red food coloring (about 2 mini squeezy bottles worth)

What to Do:
Whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, cocoa and salt in a large mixing bowl.

In a separate bowl, blend together the buttermilk, eggs, melted (and cooled) butter, and vanilla extract.

Add the wet ingredients into the dry, mixing with a whisk as you go. Once this is combined, add in your sour cream, vinegar and red food coloring.

A note about the red food coloring: You actually need more than you think. When I first started, I thought, “hey a couple o’ drops should do the trick.” No. My first pancake was brown with a slight pink tone to it. Throw that dye in there. You can do it gradually, but be generous.

Heat up a non stick griddle or frying pan over medium-low heat, coating it with a little bit of butter. Ladle the batter onto the griddle to create pancake circles about 4 inches in diameter.

A note about cooking the pancakes: It’s better to cook these slowly over low heat. If your pancakes burn, or cook too quickly on the outside, they will brown. You want red velvet, yes? Not browny-red velvet. So go slowly.

While cooking, the pancakes will start to bubble on the uncooked side that’s facing up. This is a sign they are ready to be flipped. Break out your spatula (I love saying that) and flip them over. When you can poke your pancake in the center (GENTLY!) and it bounces back, that means it’s done. Remove to a plate to cool. Don’t shove them in your pancake-hole immediately, because they’re kind of hot. Trust me.

Dust with confectioners sugar, and top with Cream Cheese Frosting.

For the Frosting:

What You Need:
12 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

What To Do:
Using hand held mixer or a standing mixer, beat 12 ounces cream cheese, 1/2 cup butter and vanilla extract in large bowl until smooth. Add powdered sugar 1 cup at a time, beating until smooth after each addition.

Note: Alternately, I think mascarpone cheese is a nice substitution to the cream cheese frosting.


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A week or so ago, I learned via Twitter that Eataly now sells fresh, uncooked pizza dough. Readers of this blog know that John and I like to make our own pizza dough. But SOMETIMES….just sometimes….you can’t. You might not have time, or yeast, or flour because you gave it all to the sourdough starter that is living on the top of your fridge and that you expect has been drinking all your wine because you don’t seem to have any left in the apartment…

Clearly, I digress. Sometimes you need to use someone else’s dough. I’m not here to judge you. I AM here to judge other people’s dough.

And I’m starting with Eataly’s, which I picked up in one of their numerous refrigerated sections for $3.20. Not a bad price. While I was there, I also picked up some purple potatoes and fresh rosemary which I was going to use in combination with the fresh ricotta cheese I made to top the pizza.

And one more wild card, because, let’s face it people, I’m not here to be normal. I have been wanting to try different methods of baking pizza. I have a pizza stone, which delivers great results. I have also used a cookie sheet with some success. This time, I wanted to use my cast iron pot. I thought that by trapping the heat in a smaller area (the pot) I would achieve a crispier outer crust with a more moist center. This was my hypothesis, anyway.

General Instructions:
I heated up my pot in the oven at 500 degrees for one half hour before placing the dough inside.

Placing the dough in the pot is a little tricky. The pot gets VERY HOT (please remember your oven mitts). And you have to get the dough in there, and then place on all your toppings while the dough is starting to sizzle and cook already. Kind of stressful.

But I did it. And I didn’t even burn myself (I did cut myself slicing potatoes though)! I got my dough into the pot, smeared on some ricotta cheese (the truffle salt and olive oil variety), and topped it with sliced potatoes (instructions below), olive oil, a pinch more truffle salt and some rosemary.

Then, I put the lid back on the pot and put the whole device in the oven. And then I checked it 10 minutes later. The crust wasn’t really charring, and it was cooking more slowly overall. I baked it for about 20-25 minutes (as compared to the usual 10 minutes on the pizza stone).

The crust did not char, but turned a nice golden brown. The bottom was almost like a thick, crusty bread rather than a pizza crust. This is the result of the cast iron pot. I believe I will be returning to the pizza stone (hypothesis proven WRONG).

BUT! What about the Eataly crust? How did it taste? I have to say, I give Eataly’s dough my stamp of approval. It was moist (even in the face of my cast iron pot experiment, and had a nice airy texture combined with a delicate olive oil/salty/yeasty flavor that was just right. My friend Meg ran over to my apartment when I started tweeting that there was pizza in the oven, so she can also attest to the fine flavor of the crust.

And finally, here is the recipe for the Ricotta, Rosemary and Potato Topping:

What You Need:
8 small purple potatoes, sliced thinly
Ricotta cheese (from this recipe)
Fresh rosemary (as many sprigs as you like)
Truffle salt (a few pinches)
1 tablespoon olive oil + extra drizzle for the pizza
1/4 cup water

What To Do:
Slice your potatoes (don’t cut yourself like I did).

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Place your sliced potatoes in the pan and and a pinch of salt. Toss to coat with oil and salt, and let the taters heat up. Add 1/4 cup of water to steam them a bit and some fresh chopped rosemary. Simmer until tender (you will be able to easily pierce them with a knife.

Spread the ricotta cheese on your stretched out pizza dough. Top with the potato mixture. Drizzle with a little olive oil, and add some more rosemary if you like.

Bake in the oven at 500 degrees (on a pizza stone, preferably) for about 10 minutes.

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The Story of How the Box Became THE BOX:
One day, a few years back I received a text message from John. At this time, John was using a cell phone that required him to push the number buttons several times to register the proper letter equivalent while texting. You all remember these phones…some of you may still have one, yes? Hopefully not. ANYWAY, John texted me about our dad. THE BOX. But he was not yet called The Box.

He WAS called “Fat Boy,” a name I have called him since I was in the fourth grade. Cute, don’t you think? Anyway, John did not push the “XYZ” button on his phone the appropriate number of times, so instead of texting “Fat Boy” in reference to our dad, he texted, “Fat Box.”

It has become, in my opinion, the most advantageous typographical error in cell phone history. Fat Boy ever after became Fat Box, and then “The Box,” which is a great name for our dad. So, in honor of him, We present this pasta recipe: Pasta for The Box, But Not From a Box. Wearing Sox.


What You Need:
2 (28-ounce) cans whole tomatoes with juice or crushed tomatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil
6 ounces pancetta or 6 slices bacon, finely chopped
1/2 pound ground beef chuck (not lean)
1/2 pound ground veal
1 small onion, finely chopped (about 1 cup)
1 carrot, finely chopped (about 1 cup)
1 cup dry red wine
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 pound small pasta

Garnish: Freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

What To Do:
If using whole tomatoes, in blender or food processor, purée tomatoes with juice. Set aside.

In large, heavy pot over moderate heat, heat oil until hot but not smoking. Add pancetta and sauté until golden brown, 5 to 6 minutes. Add beef, pork, and veal and sauté, breaking up meat with back of spoon, until browned, 7 to 8 minutes. Add onion and carrot and sauté until vegetables are tender, 5 to 6 minutes.

Stir in red wine and simmer, scraping up browned bits stuck to bottom of pan, until liquid is reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Stir in tomatoes, cream, salt, and pepper. Reduce heat to moderately low and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until sauce is thickened and brick-red in color, approximately 30 minutes.

In large pot of boiling salted water, cook pasta until almost tender. Drain well and toss with sauce. Serve with grated cheese.

For Homemade Pasta:

As a general rule of thumb, use 1 cup of flour/egg per person.  Create a “well” in your pile of flour and crack the egg(s) into the well.

Break up the egg yolk with your fingers first, then slowly gather in your flour until it is gone.  Add sprinkles of flour or drops of water to combat a wet or dry mixture.

Knead dough until it has achieved a proper “bounce back” feel to it.  Once it is ready, feed the dough into your pasta machine between the rollers at its widest setting.  Crank that bad boy through and, gradually, narrow the setting on the rollers so until the dough gets very thin.  Once thin, feed the sheet of dough through the setting for shredding.

Place the noodles on a floured pan to negate any sticking.  Then, add to a pot of boiling water for 1-2 minutes. Viola.

This recipe was inspired by one found here on Epicurious.com.

Feel free to view our other videos, seen here, here, and here.

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My Aunt Emily sends me a birthday card every year. But it’s my responsibility to IMMEDIATELY call her upon receipt of this card. Or else. I’m done. Seriously.

On my last birthday, I received my card as usual. So I called.

“Thank you for the card, Aunt Emily,” I shouted (you may recall that she can’t hear very well), “How are you?” Demerits are also given for not immediately asking how she is doing.

“Oh I don’t want to talk about that. I want to hear about someone special.” Translation: She wants to know about my love life.

Really?

“There’s no one special right now, Aunt Emily,” I responded, still loudly, and through gritted teeth.

“Well you’re just getting fussy,” she decides.

Fussy? I have two things to say about this:

1. The last time she asked me this question, I happened to be dating someone. When I told her this, she took me aside and whispered in my ear, “Play the field.” Huh.

2. Yes, indeed, I am fussy. Here’s why:

I will demonstrate with the use of pie charts (this is a food blog, after all).

As demonstrated above, I have a perfect right to be fussy. There aren’t many guys that fit into that narrowest pie piece. And I feel the same way about food. Do you have a favorite food? Just one? Would you eat it, if you could, every day?

Why would I eat sub-par pasta? What’s the point? I’m not looking to fill a void (although my stomach is frequently empty). I want those calories to count! As the above chart suggests, I do have a few foods that I would eat every day.

Breakfast: Baked Oatmeal with Blueberries and Cranberries

I actually do eat oatmeal for breakfast every morning. Add that to the list of things you really didn’t need to know. Usually, my cabinet is stacked with this brand, but recently I decided to give baked oatmeal a try. What resulted was the equivalent of a giant, chewy oatmeal cookie that filled my apartment with the aroma of cinnamon and warm blueberries. Here’s the recipe, which was inspired by this one at Fresh and Foodie.

What you need:
2 large eggs
1/2 cups sugar (you can use brown sugar)
1/3 cup butter, melted and cooled slightly
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3 teaspoons ground flax seed
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
Pinch of salt
1 cup milk
1/2 cup shredded unsweetened coconut
3 cups rolled oats
As many blueberries and cranberries as you want to throw in there. Or none – your call.

Top with: Nuts, and warm milk

What To Do:
Lightly grease an 8″x8″ baking dish (I actually used a round one).

Mix eggs and sugar in the bottom of the dish, whisking to remove lumps. Add melted butter and carefully whisk to combine. Add baking powder, vanilla, ground flax seed, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt directly to the dish and whisk well. Add the milk and stir to combine.

Stir in the toasted coconut and oats, folding into the mixture, making sure everything is combined well. Cover the dish with plastic wrap and refrigerate over night.

The next morning, preheat the oven to 350 degrees and bake the oatmeal for approximately 45 minutes, or until the edges are brown. (I actually woke up, popped it in the oven, set my alarm for 45 minutes and went back to sleep. When I woke up breakfast was served!)

Remove from oven and let cool for a few minutes. Then cut yourself a piece, top it with milk and whatever else you want. Make sure you get some of the crispy edges in your slice.

Lunch: Sweet Potato Fries with Arugula Salad (AKA Working French Fries into Your Daily Diet)

I get a little overwhelmed when I try to express my love for french fries. Where to start? The salty, crispy outer shell or the inner mushy, slightly sweet center? I like all varieties: original, sweet potato, truffle flavored, those Old Bay seasoned ones you get at the Frying Pan…A perfect food. Except for all that business about the health detriments of fried food. What’s a fussy girl to do? Make my own roasted sweet potato fries, that’s what! Then stick ’em in a salad for some leafy-green balance. Here’s how:

What You Need:
(serves 1)
1 sweet potato
Handful of arugula (enough to cover the bottom of a pasta/salad bowl
Sun-dried tomatoes
Roasted brussels sprouts (recipe here)
Sprinkling of goat cheese

Dressing: Balsamic vinegar mixed with extra virgin olive oil and a touch of sea salt.

What To Do:
Heat up your oven to 400 degrees. Peel your sweet potato, then either cut into wedges or use a mandolin to make waffle fries! Place your cut, raw potatoes in a bowl, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt.

Space evenly on a cookie sheet and pop them in the oven. After about 15 minutes (for wedges – less time for thinner cuts), flip them over so the other side can get nice and brown). Use a spatula, please. I don’t want any martyrs or burn victims. Roast for another 10 minutes or so, keeping a sharp eye the whole time. Take them out, let them cool slightly.

Prepare your salad by starting with a layer of sun dried tomatoes on the bottom of the plate. Then pile on some arugula, a layer of your sweet potato “fries,” and brussels sprouts. You should now have a nice tower of vegetables. Top with crumbled goat cheese and if there is some white wine wandering around your place, pour yourself a glass of that too. OK, not for lunch. Well, maybe.

Dinner: Pasta Cacio e Pepe

When I was in Rome this past October with Marmo, I had my favorite meal at Roma Sparita: their Spaghetti Cacio e Pepe which was served in a bowl of fried cheese. Fried cheese bowl! What’s not to love? You can see the original here.

I decided I needed to make this for myself. It’s such a simple dish and a very traditional Roman one too. The main ingredients are just Peccorino Romano cheese, salt and lots of freshly ground black pepper. However, it feels luxurious. A little swirl of reserved pasta water added to the cooked spaghetti gives the dish a creamy texture. Swirling this pasta around my fork, I pretend I’m sitting at Roma Sparita’s blue-checked outdoor tables with the sunshine gleaming through my decanter of wine.

I purchased the cheese at Murray’s Cheese Shop on Bleecker where the helpful cheesemongers picked out a nice sharp variety with a dark rind. The cheesemonger BEGGED me to eat the rind (please, PLEASE eat the rind, he said). So I did. When I grated it on my pasta, I made sure to grate the rind as well. It added pretty flecks of brown and gray to the the dish, as well as a bit of texture.

Here is the recipe I used, which is based on this one from Smitten Kitchen:

What You Need:
Serves 1-2 (depending on how much you eat)
2 tablespoon olive oil
1/3 pound dried spaghetti
1 tablespoon butter
4 ounces Pecorino Romano cheese, finely grated (don’t forget the rind!)
1 1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper
Pinch of cayenne pepper
Salt (optional)
Reserved pasta water (about a cup)

What To Do:
Cook spaghetti in well-salted boiling water in a large, wide-bottomed pot. Drain spaghetti, reserving 1 1/2 cups of pasta cooking water.

Dry out your pot, then heat the olive oil over high heat. Add drained spaghetti and 3/4 cup of reserved pasta water and watch out as the pot is very hot and will make the water splatter around a bit.

Add butter, cheese, ground pepper and cayenne and toss together with tongs. Taste, adding more pasta water, cheese, pepper or salt to taste. Be careful adding salt as Peccorino is a salty cheese.

Serve immediately, sprinkling with reserved cheese and an extra grind or two of black pepper.

I’m still working on the fried cheese bowl…

Got a food you would eat every day? Tell us about it in the comments section. The fussier, the better.

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