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Archive for the ‘Cakes’ Category

Looking for a dessert for Easter Sunday? Since today’s theme is being helpful, I thought I would throw this Fruit and Nut Trifle out there. You will want to eat the whole bowl. The. Whole. Bowl. Do it.

Fruit and Nut Trifle

Trifle
What You Need:
1 c of almonds chopped
2 t water
4 t sugar
2 t cinnamon
1 c dried apricots and cranberries chopped
2 t butter
2 pears cored and diced
mandarian orange segments – small can
1 Tbsp rum
4 cups of heavy cream
1/2 cup confection sugar
1 cup orange juice
raspberries for decoration
sponge cake – see below for recipe

What To Do:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  In a bowl toss the nuts with cinamon then water and sugar and then spread on a sheet pan and bake for 5 minutes and toast for about 7 minutes.

Chop dried fruit and cover with hot water and a little rum and let set for 10 minutes.  Drain the fruit and add to the nuts. Toss.

In a saute pan heat the butter and add a little sugar. Add the diced pears and saute and then add the fruits and nuts.

In a bowl mix the heavy cream with the confectioners sugar vanilla and rum.  Mix until cream is whipped to soft peaks.

Brush the cake with the orange juice to make it a little moist.

In a trifle bowl first add some whipped cream and then place the sponge cake on top to cover the cream.  Layer with the fruit/nut mixture and then add a little cream.  Follow with the cake and continue to build the trifle.  Finish with the whipped cream.  For a festive look top with fresh raspberries. Refrigerate at least 6 hours or overnight.

Sponge Cake

What You Need:
8 eggs
1 cup flour
1 1/4 cup cugar
1 Tablespoon lemon zest
orange juice for brushing (optional)

What To Do:
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter a large square pan (13″x18″) and line with parchment paper.

Put the eggs into a mixer (Kitchenaid or handheld). Slowly add the sugar to the eggs, beating until they are twice the volume from when they started and a pale lemon color.

Slowly add the flour to the above ingredients and also the lemon zest.

Pour the mixture into the pan and bake for 15 minutes.

After it’s done, you can brush the cake with some orange juice, using a pastry brush. This makes it nice and juicy, and adds a complementing flavor for the fruit and nuts in the trifle.

Try not to eat it all. Or eat it all. Whichever.

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Two weeks ago, I had my most popular tweet ever (it beat out the old record holder, “I am in love with a squash”). I posted a photo of some red velvet pancakes that I enjoyed at the Original Pancake House in West Caldwell, NJ. People went bonkers over this picture! I received requests for the recipe (didn’t have one), pleas for descriptions, and threats on my life (not really) if I didn’t post more details soon.

This weekend I covered my kitchen in red dye, flour, and confectioners sugar in an attempt to deliver a recipe to you. But first, I will give you some highlights from the Original Pancake House.

This Christmas wreath greeted us in the Pancake House parking lot. I was immediately on my guard. I am suspicious of holiday decorations kept up overly-long. However, I persisted (fortitude!) and ordered the following: a Southwestern Omelette with a side of Red Velvet Pancakes.

Still slightly put off by the Christmas wreath, I dove into the pancakes. They were amazing: silky smooth, moist (not crumbly at all), with a hint of chocolate flavor and sweetness. I loved them. I even took the leftovers home (along with the leftovers of everyone else).

On a random side note, the Southwestern Omelette was HUGE. I think it was comprised of about 12 eggs. That were inflated. It was the fluffiest omelette I’ve ever seen or eaten, and its resemblance to a half-deflated volley ball should not count against it:

And in true Jersey diner fashion, there were post-meal gumballs.

But back to the pancakes! This is what you want, yes? A recipe! And here it is. I have cobbled this together from a few sources, and also made parts of it up as taste dictated. I hope you enjoy. I really do, because this recipe makes a cart-full of pancakes, so you’ll have a lot of them to deal with.

For the Pancakes:
(NOTE: This makes a heck of a lot of pancakes. Way more than even I can eat at once.
2 cups flour
3 tablespoons sugar
1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups buttermilk
2 eggs
1/4 cup unsalted butter (1/2 of a stick) + more to grease the griddle or frying pan
3 1/2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder (I used Ghirardelli)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons white vinegar
Red food coloring (about 2 mini squeezy bottles worth)

What to Do:
Whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, cocoa and salt in a large mixing bowl.

In a separate bowl, blend together the buttermilk, eggs, melted (and cooled) butter, and vanilla extract.

Add the wet ingredients into the dry, mixing with a whisk as you go. Once this is combined, add in your sour cream, vinegar and red food coloring.

A note about the red food coloring: You actually need more than you think. When I first started, I thought, “hey a couple o’ drops should do the trick.” No. My first pancake was brown with a slight pink tone to it. Throw that dye in there. You can do it gradually, but be generous.

Heat up a non stick griddle or frying pan over medium-low heat, coating it with a little bit of butter. Ladle the batter onto the griddle to create pancake circles about 4 inches in diameter.

A note about cooking the pancakes: It’s better to cook these slowly over low heat. If your pancakes burn, or cook too quickly on the outside, they will brown. You want red velvet, yes? Not browny-red velvet. So go slowly.

While cooking, the pancakes will start to bubble on the uncooked side that’s facing up. This is a sign they are ready to be flipped. Break out your spatula (I love saying that) and flip them over. When you can poke your pancake in the center (GENTLY!) and it bounces back, that means it’s done. Remove to a plate to cool. Don’t shove them in your pancake-hole immediately, because they’re kind of hot. Trust me.

Dust with confectioners sugar, and top with Cream Cheese Frosting.

For the Frosting:

What You Need:
12 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 cups powdered sugar

What To Do:
Using hand held mixer or a standing mixer, beat 12 ounces cream cheese, 1/2 cup butter and vanilla extract in large bowl until smooth. Add powdered sugar 1 cup at a time, beating until smooth after each addition.

Note: Alternately, I think mascarpone cheese is a nice substitution to the cream cheese frosting.


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Due to the past success of Dinner with the Megs: Cheese and Wine night, the Megs and I decided to have another go at it, this time with cupcakes and wine. Pairing drinks with desserts is not a new concept (digestif, anyone?), but it has become a trend in recent years.

We didn’t want to jump on any bandwagons, but we did want to eat cupcakes. And drink wine. At the same time. So, the Megs and I embarked on Pairing Dinner Volume II: Cupcakes and Wine.

The Rules: This time the cupcakes would dictate the wine we chose. We needed:
1 type of Savory cupcake (this was my responsibility)
1 type of Sweet cupcake that was NOT chocolate (Meg L)
1 type of Sweet cupcake that WAS chocolate (Meg H)

You also needed to bring a wine that paired with your chosen cupcake. As an added rule, we decided that the cupcakes could either be homemade or store bought (sometimes it’s hard to work cupcake baking into daily life, try as we might).

For the savory cupcake, I made Butternut Squash, Kale and Sage cupcakes, and topped them with a dollop of cream cheese (as a stand-in for frosting). You can find the recipe here. These cupcakes are a great savory choice, as the butternut squash adds an element of sweetness which contrasts the with saltier ingredients, such as the Parmesan cheese.

The wine that the helpful staff at Bottlerocket on 19th street chose to pair with this cupcake was Zaccagni il Castello (2008), a smooth Italian white that has a hint of bitterness that goes well with the sage in the cupcakes. I should note that this wine was VERY well received by everyone – many thanks to Bottlerocket for the recommendation.

For our Sweet but not Chocolate cupcake, Meg L procured some pastel-frosted Vanilla Buttermilk confections from Magnolia Bakery. The icing on these cakes was something to behold – as well as taste. Swirling mounds of lavender, mint green and pale cream frosting topped off light yellow cake.

For wine, Meg L chose a Blueberry wine from Alba Vineyards in New Jersey, which really did taste like blueberries. Almost purple in color, it presented a strong flavor contrast to its lighter, vanilla counterparts.

Finally…chocolate! Meg H traveled to the Cupcake Stop’s Limelight Marketplace outpost to bring us these chocolate cake/icing beauties. The dark chocolate cake was topped with two dollops of a lighter, creamy frosting, drizzled with a bit of white chocolate.

I think Meg H was unaware, but Brachetto D’Aqui is one of my favorite sweet wines. It takes all my restraint not to just throw a straw in the bottle and sip away. When Meg H unveiled her Pineto Brachetto d’Aqui, I squealed with delight (and started searching my cabinets for straws).
The Brachetto has a nice effervescence that, while still a red, gives it a lighter quality. It doesn’t overwhelm the chocolate cupcakes.

Finally, because we thought this meal might be a touch on the sugary side, we threw in a kale salad. And throw it together we did with the following ingredients and in the following manner:

What You Need:
1 bunch kale, rinsed, stems removed and chopped
2 cups roasted butternut squash (left over from the savory cupcakes)
Handful of sun dried tomatoes, cut into thin strips
1 yellow zucchini, washed, cut into rounds
½ cup pine nuts
Salt and pepper to taste
Balsamic Vinegar and extra virgin olive oil for dressing

What To Do:
Get out a big salad bowl and throw in your washed and chopped kale. Go on, literally THROW it in there. You won’t hurt the kale.
Add in your butternut squash chunks (more gently), the sun dried tomatoes, zucchini (resist the urge to throw these around your kitchen like mini-frisbees), and everything else.

Drizzle with as much balsamic and olive oil as you like and give it a toss to coat evenly.

Then promptly ignore this salad in favor of cupcakes.

No, it’s actually a very good salad. And since kale is essentially spinach with ruffles, it’s just fancy enough for a cupcake and wine party.

Cheers!

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It’s 3am and I’ve just returned home. I’m hungry. Not just hungry, I’ve worked up the kind of appetite that only results from a night out. I know, I know – how juvenile. Zip it.

The apartment is dark, illuminated only by the refrigerator light. I hear tiny little paw steps – Toby is checking in on me and throws me a reproachful glance as I peer into the depths of the fridge looking for….what is it that I want?

I want cake. More specifically, I want chocolate, pecan, sour cream bundt cake It’s Marmo’s recipe made with 2 sticks of butter, almost 3 cups of sugar and chunky strata in the middle and along the bottom of bittersweet chocolate chips and chopped pecans.

This is an anytime cake. And by anytime, I mean anytime of day and anytime of year. However, I’ve eaten it most often in the summertime (I’m fantasizing about warmer weather), down at the Jersey Shore, wandering home at the end of an evening out.

The cake will be sitting on the counter top, loosely tucked in for the night with a piece of tin foil, just allowing me to glimpse a few stray chips and nuts that have freed themselves from the mother cake and are resting helplessly on the platter…waiting…

Occasionally I can be civilized, cut myself a generous slice, locate a fork and sit down at the table to discuss the evening’s adventures with a group of friends, neighbors, or who’s ever rolled in off the street attracted by the smell of baking butter and chocolate. Sometimes, I’ve just grabbed chunks off of it with my bare hands, all dignified-like.

It’s insanely satisfying: dense (like the hamburger of cakes) with a nice crunch supplied by the pecans and a shot of richness from the chocolate. It’s the perfect cake for, well…for drunk eating. There I said it.

It being January, many of us are coming off a long holiday season of liquid indulgences. And those kinds of indulgences frequently lead to me searching in vain for this cake.

What follows is the recipe for Marmo’s Chocolate Pecan Sour Cream Bundt Cake. A warning: don’t make it too often unless you have either an NFL team or a pack of famished raccoons to feed because you’ll eat the whole thing by yourself, with or without impaired judgment.

This cake also freezes well so you can make some for now and save some for 3am…I mean, later.

What You Need:
3 cups flour
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
3 cups sugar (Note: I actually cut it down to 2 1/2 and it worked for me)
1 cup sour cream (the full-fat stuff)
2 cups chopped pecans
Bittersweet chocolate chips (you can use semi-sweet, milk, or white chocolate if you prefer)
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 sticks unsalted butter, softened
6 large eggs
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
Either a large (3 quart) bundt cake pan or a set of mini ones.

What To Do:
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease (with butter) and flour a 3 quart bundt pan.

In a bowl, whisk together the flour, salt, and baking soda.

In another bowl with an electric mixer (or you can use a food processor), beat together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the sour cream and vanilla and mix well. With the mixer on low speed, gradually add in the flour mixture until just combined.

Pour about half of the batter into the prepared bundt pan and sprinkle with half of the chocolate chips and half of the pecans. Pour the remaining amount of batter on top of this and sprinkle with the remaining chips and nuts.

Bake in the middle of the oven for 1 hour 20 minutes (smaller bundt pans will require less time), until a tester (like a toothpick) inserted into the cake comes out clean. Cool in the pan for an hour, and then invert onto a platter. Dust with confectioner’s sugar if you like (optional).

* Note: I used mini-bundt cake pans that have a fun pattern etched into them. Makes these little guys look quite dignified (one of us should). Small cakes can also be given away as gifts so you don’t eat them all on your own.

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